ANTIQUE FACTS

Is it an Antique or Not?

Finding a definitive definition for both an antique and a collectible is not possible. Just what constitutes an antique and what constitutes a collectible is determined by each individual antique dealer. Many times, the dealers will give varied answers to the seemingly simple question, "What is a collectible and what is an antique?"

Most dealers will agree that historically an antique is any crafted or manufactured item that is at least 100 years old. Collectibles are items less than 100 years old. Antiques generally are rare and worth a higher amount, while collectibles' values are more speculative and can change at a moment's notice. (This can be seen with items centered around popular television shows or movies. Some may become antiques, but normally they are collectibles that will only have value so long as that show or movie remains popular.)

Some dealers are attempting to lower the standard of an antique. They believe that items over 50 years old should be considered an antique. Those who are reputable antique dealers say the 50 years definition lowers the standard to a point that dealers can sell collectibles under the name of antiques.

However, it should be noted that the label "antique" or "collectible" has no real effect on the worth of an item. The price of an item is determined more by whether there is a demand for it. There are very rare antiques which are sold for much less than a newer collectible, but this is because there is no demand for the former and a high demand for the latter.

When it comes to purchasing items on the antique or collectible market, the buyer should do a lot of research before handing over any money. Flea markets with antique stands, antique shops, and antique malls are plentiful, so dealers have a lot of competition in stocking their shops. This can lead them to price their items much higher than their true value, which is a bad investment for you. Why buy an antique or a collectible for more than it is worth?

So, when you compare antiques to collectibles, antiques stand the test of time. Their value remains constant. Collectibles, however, are priced more on a whim and their long term value is highly speculative. Exercise caution when investing in collectibles as opposed to antiques.

Sharon Stajda, http://www.squidoo.com/antiqueorcollectible

What is patina? If an object is described as having a fine patina it's usually meant as a compliment. Patina is everything that happens to an object over the course of time. The nick in the leg of a table, a scratch on a table top, the loss of moisture in the paint, the crackling of a finish or a glaze in ceramics, the gentle wear patterns on the edge of a plate, are all part of an items patina. All these things add up to create a softer look, subtle color changes, a unique character that has value. Patina is built from all the effects, natural and man-made, that create a true antique.

Other References for Patina:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patina